Jonny Bairstow: England batsman still keen to play all three formats after Ben Stokes’ retirement from ODI | cricket news

Jonny Bairstow: “I think [50-over cricket] It is a very good format. The journey we have undertaken as a group to reach [winning] The 2019 World Cup was amazing. I also think in a way it’s a springboard into Test cricket.”

Last update: 07/22/22 4:18 pm

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Jonny Bairstow talks to Michael Atherton about his desire to continue playing in all forms of cricket, the current schedule and his fondness for one day international cricket.

Jonny Bairstow talks to Michael Atherton about his desire to continue playing in all forms of cricket, the current schedule and his fondness for one day international cricket.

England batsman Jonny Bairstow says he wants to play all three formats “for as long as possible”, despite Ben Stokes’ recent retirement from international one-day cricket.

Stokes cited an “unsustainable” schedule as a contributing factor in his decision to retire from the over-50 format at age 31.

Bairstow, 32, is one of the last remaining ‘all format’ players in the England squad and, speaking to sky sports Michael Atherton, you wish that was the case for a while yet.

“Naturally there are challenges, we’ve seen it over a period of time,” Bairstow said.

England Test captain Ben Stokes speaks to Nasser Hussain about his decision to retire from ODI cricket and says the schedule and pressure on England players have become untenable for him.

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England Test captain Ben Stokes speaks to Nasser Hussain about his decision to retire from ODI cricket and says the schedule and pressure on England players have become untenable for him.

England Test captain Ben Stokes speaks to Nasser Hussain about his decision to retire from ODI cricket and says the schedule and pressure on England players have become untenable for him.

“We just have to look at the tests from this summer, where there was a one-day team in Holland at the same time. Even at the end of this summer, there are seven T20s in Pakistan that pretty much overlap with the last test match. [against South Africa].

“But you know me well enough to know that I will try to play in all forms for as long as possible.

“I will do my best for as long as I can. There may come a time when, for different reasons, you have to make a decision, but that is part of life and an integral part of cricket.”

“In the near future, I don’t see myself making a decision. I love being a part of all three teams.”

“I feel good. I think there is definitely a difference behind Covid. Being able to be accelerated by the crowd, I am someone who feeds off the energy of the crowd, it has allowed my personality to come out again. I have loved every part of it. this summer so far, and hopefully that can continue.

Jonny Bairstow on his batting form

‘ODI cricket is a springboard for testing’

As for the schedule, Atherton along with Ravi Shastri, Mark Butcher and former white ball captain Eoin Morgan discussed at length the “tipping point” the game is at due to the demands placed on players and the balance of power that seemingly shifts from the international game to the cricket franchise.

Fearing that the two-sided series could be at greater risk, specifically the 50+ game, Bairstow stressed that he still loves the format, warning of the risks of young players only committing to the “roller coaster” of the cricket T20.

Mark Butcher explains why he is worried about the future of over-50 cricket in England

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Mark Butcher explains why he is worried about the future of over-50 cricket in England

Mark Butcher explains why he is worried about the future of over-50 cricket in England

“I think it’s a really good format,” Bairstow said. “The journey we have undertaken as a group to reach [winning] The 2019 World Cup was amazing.

“I also think that over-50 cricket is, in a way, a stepping stone into Test cricket. You work yourself longer, sometimes you have to get through difficult periods and play good cricket shots. The middle overs, especially, they look a lot like Test Cricket”.

Ravi Shastri believes that for Test cricket to survive in the future, it must consider the

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Ravi Shastri believes that for Test cricket to survive in the future, it must consider “quality over quantity” and reduce teams.

Ravi Shastri believes that for Test cricket to survive in the future, it must consider “quality over quantity” and reduce teams.

He added: “There is the appeal of playing in the T20 leagues and making quick money, let’s be honest about it.

“But, it all comes from your basic technique, which you learn in four-day cricket, and then you expand from that.

“Look at [Joe] Root, for example, his technique is fantastic and then he takes it from Test cricket to 50+ cricket to T20 cricket… and all he does is expand his game.

“I think if you try to just watch T20 cricket it can be tricky in a way because it’s a roller coaster ride that can go very fast.

“Your bread and butter is your four day cricket, your 50+ cricket and then your T20 cricket, make an impact on that and then move on and allow it to have more longevity.”

Enjoy the sound of Jonny Bairstow's bat as we look back at all his limits in England so far this summer.  Twitter courtesy of @englandcricket

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Enjoy the sound of Jonny Bairstow’s bat as we look back at all his limits in England so far this summer. Twitter courtesy of @englandcricket

Enjoy the sound of Jonny Bairstow’s bat as we look back at all his limits in England so far this summer. Twitter courtesy of @englandcricket

“Playing all three formats will keep you awake at night”

Expanding on cricket’s packed schedule further, Bairstow said: “I don’t think we have a choice, do we? Time is time.”

“It’s tough. You want to play, but I think Stokesy is right in a way – I mentioned about overlapping games.

“There used to be days leading up and training before games, but this is the first time in 11 years I’ve been with England that we have back-to-back games on successive days.

“They’re also trying to fit into different things like The Hundred, so it’s tricky.

“There are going to be impacts and if you’re playing all those formats at full intensity, it’s going to take it away from you.”

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